Conservatory Jargon Buster

The definitive guide to common terms used in the design and installation of conservatories.


For over 20 years now Ultraframe has been the acknowledged market leader in the design and manufacture of conservatory roof systems. With over one million Ultraframe roofs already installed throughout the UK, the pedigree and quality offered by our roof systems is second to none. During this time Ultraframe have developed a widely recognised set of guidelines by which conservatory roofs are designed, specified, ordered and installed.

Ultraframe have complied this manual to explain and translate much of the jargon used in the conservatory industry. We have listed many of the commonplace words and terms used daily in connection with conservatory design and installation.

Each reference includes a list of possible alternative words (“also known as”), a full description of the product/component and a full colour picture, where appropriate, to illustrate its relevance.

To find the explanation for your jargon term just browse the terms alphabetically below or Search Our Site.

 

Tempered glass

Tempered glass

Also known as: Toughened glass

Tempered glass is normal float glass which is heated to make it five times stronger than normal annealed glass

Three quarter wok

Three quarter wok

Also known as: Wrap around

A three quarter wok is an external 270 degree corner (internal 90 degrees).

Tie bar

Tie bar

Also known as: Tie rod, roof brace, 'A' frame

A tie bar is the triangular bracing system designed to keep a roof in the desired/correct position under extreme snow and wind loads.

Toe and heel

Toe and heel

Also known as: 'Jacking' the door

Toe and heel is a process needed to set and balance PVC doors on a conservatory.

Top opener/fanlight

Top opener/fanlight

Also known as: Fanlight, pushout

Top opener refers to the small windows that open at the top of the sideframes, just under the eaves beam.

Transom bar

Transom bar

Also known as: Vic transom

A transom bar is the glazing bar that goes from the eaves to ridge, usually along the side of a conservatory. In the image one of the transom bars is highlighted in red. A transom is always at 90 degree to the ridge/wallplate and eaves.

Trickle ventilation

Trickle ventilation

Also known as: Frame ventilation, head vents, strip ventilators, slot vents, eavesflow

Trickle ventilation refers to units with on/off catches which allow small amounts of natural air flow into a conservatory.